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A helpful response to new and upcoming producers.

advice producing mixdown sounds

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5 replies to this topic

#1
TheWhiteTiger

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Hello,

This is a response to Bmo27, who was asking for advice from me.

However, i feel like it could be useful for others as well.

I'm by no means a professional, but i feel like i have a good insight after two and a half year.

The music that i have up on my accounts, are very outdated compared to my current knowledge i feel.

So listening to that does not necessarily give you a reflection of my skill level. 

Here is my response.

 

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I can tell that you are fairly new to producing, which is fine. Everyone needs to start somewhere, but it's hard for me to point out something specific that needs improvement, when everything does. That's how it always is in the start. You need to just keep at it and learn everything you can.

 

But a good idea would be to start learning about how you get a good mixdown. That is probably one of the most common problems for all

new and upcoming producers. And you usually don't realize that it is a problem, at least i didn't. 

Mixdown is one of the most important elements in EDM currently to get on bigger promotion channels and such.

It's a boring task, but when you figure it out, it will be very rewarding.

The most common mistake in mixing is that people usually want either the melodies or the bassline to be the loudest thing in the track.

But really, it should always be the drums. (Mainly kick and snare) 

By doing that, it gives the track much more energy and space to breath.

I usually lower all drums to -3db (for when the track needs mastering) and then i keep the rest to around -6db or where i see fit. It all depends on the sound and such.

But this should give you an initial idea of how the process could work.

Don't bother about mastering until you figured this out. (I've only just figured it out recently myself at a point where im happy with the sounds. And i've been at it for around two and a half year.)

 

Another thing is trying to add more instruments and effects to your track.

Listeners get bored fast when it comes to music, so the way you keep them interested is by introducing new things regularly throughout the track. (A thing i like to do is adding sounds that gives the track a story. You can clearly hear this technique used in my old track Memory.)

Presets from different software is completely fine to use when starting out. However, there is this "elite" in EDM, who will call you out for using them when you reach a certain fan size. So the community will eventually force you into making your own sounds.

Which is fine, since it opens up for a lot more of different possibilities

That's also what i've been working on a lot lately. It's tough to suddenly having to learn this technique, since there is so much to it.

 

Also, a very common mistake, that frustrates me a lot:

Don't go around and spam comment sections on youtube and such for people to go and listen to your music.

(It's alright to write on forums tho, but just keep in mind that those who are here, are probably producing themselves. Which means there aren't much point to posting your tracks other than for criticism and such. You won't gain a fanbase on here is pretty much what i'm trying to say.)

Send your tracks to promoter. If they don't upload it, it usually means that you need to go and improve your stuff some more.

 

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I dunno if what i wrote above makes sense, so feel free to ask questions and such in this thread.

I will do my best to reply.

 


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#2
bmo27

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I'm not going to spam youtube comments section btw that mastering the tracks and mixdown after I study basic music theory, I need to study about mixdowns and mastering I need to watch youtube tutorials and forums, Thanks TWT! for the response I will take note of this.



#3
alphabeing

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https://soundcloud.c...ha-being/tracks

 

hey im also a beginner,, check out my track and give me some constructive feedback.

thank you. :)



#4
Cogent989

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TheWhiteTiger pretty much sums it up! 

 

I've been Producing for about 6 years and Engineering (Recording/Editing/Mixing/Mastering) for 2 years after I went to Recording School and by no means a master at all(Far From It). Music and Production is a constant learning process and you will always learn new stuff everyday. The one thing that I can say is keep making music all the time don't stop. Sure, there are technical do's and dont's but ultimately it's all experimentation do what you feel and make sure you love it. TRUST YOUR EARS! They won't lie to you! :) 

 

On the Techy side, -3 db is a good mixdown volume. Remember you only have 0db of headroom to fit all those tracks in a digital enviroment! I try to hit between -6 and -3db on all mixes. The most important things in a mix is Kick/Snare/Bass/Vocals the rest is filler! Those should sound the best, and usually panned center not including Vox harmonies and Vox effects. The rest of the mix should flow around those Basic tracks (Kick,Snare,Bass,Vocals). as an example, Guitars are usually out wide same with piano's and synths.  Your mix should feel alive so automation is a must! It's Electronic Music so try to flow everything in to everything, sometimes evolving sounds into other sounds with filter's or distortions or reverbs and delays. But not every mix is the same so just a general rule. But rules are ment to be broken. 

 

My Effects buses are generally this 1/8Delay, 1/4Delay, Plate Reverb, Hall Reverb, Chorus (Sometimes Imager if needed) and I use them to push my sounds into these buses to give it like sort of a glue so it feels like its made to go together. As far as Eq'ing goes..... I prefer Cutting rather than Boosting in a Digital Enviroment. Remember, less is more when EQ'ing (In The Box) You built most of the sounds so you should like them. If you have analogue gear then I like to boost in analog because of the transistors built in them and it just does a little extra that sounds great!! But most of this music is made in the box so I tend to stick to cutting.  I'm an Avid fan of parallel compression and bit-crushers to saturate sounds. I generally Eq then squash with a compressor then add another Eq to Shape. But that has been a war since the beginning of the Audio Engineer profesion. I hope these tips help but there are no rules to mixing, ultimately just experiment with what sounds good. listen to your mixes on every speaker available so you get a general idea of you are doing.

 

As for Instrumentation, I keep a rule of something should happen every 4 bars or loop ending depending on what time signature. I'm A.D.D so i like the changing. I try to keep it interesting for the listener. Here is a list of BASIC Instrumentation i use:

 

Drums (Kick / Snare/Clap/HH/HH2/Ride/Crash/Percussion(Pop/Clicks/Bongos/Congas/Toms/Shakers/Tambourines Interesting little sounds) 

Bass (Sub/Mid/High/Wide)

Pads(Synth Pad/Strings/)

Rythmic Sounds(Pluck Synths/Piano/Rhodes/Guitars/)

Leads(Various Lead synths usually sum them together but not all the time)

Effect Sounds(Pluck Leads for 16th Runs/Atmospheric sounds holding root note/Sweeps/Downsweeps/Laser sounds/ReverbKicks/Sub Sweeps)

 

Hope this helps! Just a different perspective!  which is not the only way.... just do you and always keep on keepin on!

 

Cheers,

Cogent


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#5
Sneekhy

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Hey guys I'm new in this community!

I wanted to ask you, if somebody got experience with Mixcraft 7. 

 

I'm creating musical stuff there but I don't know if this program is professional enough to produce some legit chillstep...

 

I'm glad to hear any advice from you guys :)

 

Have a good day!


 - Sneekhy


#6
AaronElato

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hi lilmummy I really liked this everything sounded present and correct edit; ornithology corner - which bird is that in your soundcloud pic?




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